How Long Does It Take for a Cockroach to Die After Being Sprayed?

Getting rid of cockroaches is difficult, resulting in people resorting to various methods to get rid of them, including a can of insecticide or bug spray. The duration of a cockroach’s death after being exposed to insecticide spray depends on several factors. This includes the type of cockroach species and the insecticide used.

Some cockroaches can withstand being sprayed with insecticide and will survive for several days or even weeks. Other cockroaches will die within minutes or hours after being exposed to an insecticide.

There are different types of cockroaches, and each type has a different level of resistance to insecticides. On the other hand, insecticides vary in their ingredients and level of toxicity. Some insecticides are more toxic than others, and this will also affect how long it takes for a cockroach to die after being sprayed.

Factors Affecting How Long It Takes For A Cockroach To Die After Being Sprayed

dead cockroach on wooden floor

When you see a cockroach scuttling across your floor, your first instinct is probably to reach for the nearest can of bug spray. But how long does it actually take for a cockroach to die after being sprayed? The answer depends on several factors, including the type of insecticide used, the size of the cockroach, and its species. We’ve asked experts and did some research, and here’s what we found out:

The Type of Insecticide Used

Some insecticides work quickly, while others take a bit longer to kill. For example, those containing pyrethrin work by causing paralysis in the cockroach within minutes of being sprayed. Pyrethrin is a common and natural ingredient in many insecticides.

It can be found in products like Raid, Baygon, and Mortein. When an insecticide contains pyrethrin, paralysis sets in within minutes, and death usually follows in about an hour. One of the disadvantages of this is that some cockroaches develop resistance to pyrethrin over time.

On the other hand, there are also insecticides that work slower but are just as effective. These usually contain organophosphates, which act by disrupting the cockroach’s nervous system.

It can take several hours or even days for a cockroach to die after being sprayed with an insecticide containing organophosphates. But because they work more slowly, cockroaches have less time to develop resistance to them.

Here’s a quick summary of common household sprays with an estimate of how long it takes for them to kill cockroaches:

  • Spray with Pyrethrin: works in minutes and kills in an hour. Examples are Raid Ant & Roach Killer and Raid Max Bug Barrier.
  • Spray with Pyrethroids: works in minutes and kills in an hour. Examples are Ortho Home Defense MAX Insect Killer and Hot Shot Bedbug & Flea Fogger.
  • Aerosolized Desiccant: works in hours and days to kill. An example is D-Fense SC.
  • Boric Acid: works in days to weeks to kill. An example is Roach Prufe.
  • Spray with Deltamethrin: works in minutes and kills in an hour. An example is Raid Wasp & Hornet Killer.
  • Spray with Lambda-Cyhalothrin: works in minutes and kills in an hour. An example is Spectracide Bug Stop.
  • Spray with Organo-phosphates: works in hours to days and kills in days. An example is Malathion Insecticide Spray.

When looking for a spray, make sure that you check the product label and look at its main ingredients. This will give you an idea of which brand or product is most suited for your needs.

The Size of the Cockroach

Cockroaches come in different sizes, which can also affect how long it takes for them to die after being sprayed. Generally, larger cockroaches will take longer to die than smaller ones. This is because they have a larger body mass and can withstand more exposure to the insecticide. Larger cockroaches tend to die within 24 hours of being sprayed, while smaller cockroaches can die within minutes or hours.

The Species of Cockroach

There are different species of cockroaches, and each one has a different level of resistance to insecticides.

cockroaches coming out of a crevice

German Cockroach: This is the most common type of cockroach in the US, and it is also one of the most resistant to insecticides. German cockroaches can take up to a week to die after being sprayed. German cockroaches are characterized by their brown color and two dark stripes on their backs.

American Cockroach: American cockroaches are larger than German cockroaches, and they are also more resistant to insecticides. They can take up to two weeks to die after being sprayed. American cockroaches are reddish-brown in color with a yellow band around the edge of their body.

Brown-Banded Cockroach: Brown-banded cockroaches are smaller than German and American cockroaches, and they are less resistant to insecticides. They can take a few days to die after being sprayed. This is because they have a small body mass and can’t withstand as much exposure to the insecticide. Brown-banded cockroaches are light brown in color with two dark bands on their wings.

Oriental Cockroach: Oriental cockroaches are one of the largest types of cockroaches, and they are also very resistant to insecticides. They can take up to two weeks to die after being sprayed. Oriental cockroaches are dark brown or black in color, and they have a glossy appearance.

The Different Ingested Insecticides

Cockroaches can also ingest insecticides, and this can affect how long it takes for them to die. When a cockroach ingests an insecticide, it will take longer for the insecticide to kill the cockroach. When ingested in small amounts, cockroaches can metabolize the insecticide and survive. Ingested insecticides are not as effective as contact insecticides, and they can take days or weeks to kill a cockroach.

The Spray Nozzle

Did you know that the type of spray nozzle can also affect how long it takes for an insecticide to kill a cockroach? A fine mist nozzle will create a finer spray, which will coat the cockroach more evenly and allow the insecticide to penetrate its exoskeleton more easily, resulting in a quicker death. This is why you’ll notice that those roach bottles that are being marketed as “quick kill” have a fine mist nozzle.

On the other hand, a wide nozzle will create a wider spray, which won’t coat the cockroach as evenly. This will result in a slower death because the insecticide won’t be able to penetrate the cockroach’s exoskeleton as easily.

Does this mean that you can’t use an insecticide spray with a wide nozzle? No, you can still use an insecticide spray with a wide nozzle, but it will take longer for the cockroach to die. If you’re looking for a quicker kill, then you should use an insecticide spray with a fine mist nozzle. Wide nozzle sprays are often used to treat large areas, such as an infested kitchen.

insecticide being sprayed by a human

The Temperature

Another factor that can affect how long it takes for a cockroach to die after being sprayed is the temperature. If it’s cold outside, then the cockroach’s body will take longer to absorb the spray. This is because the cockroach’s metabolism slows down in colder temperatures, and this slows down the absorption of the insecticide.

The best temperature for an insecticide to work is between 80-90 degrees Fahrenheit. This is because the cockroach’s metabolism is highest at these temperatures, and this allows the insecticide to be quickly absorbed by the cockroach’s body.

In regions where the temperature is colder, it can take up to two weeks for a cockroach to die after being sprayed. In regions where the temperature is hotter, a cockroach can take as little as a few minutes to die after being sprayed.

What Happens to Cockroaches Who Survive After Being Sprayed?

One would think that being sprayed with a can of insecticide would be enough to kill any cockroach. However, these little creatures are actually quite resilient, and many of them survive the experience. So, what happens to cockroaches who are lucky enough to escape the clutches of death?

For starters, they usually suffer from some pretty severe burns. The chemicals in the pesticide can cause burns on their exoskeletons, and this can be very painful. In some cases, the burns are so bad that they result in the cockroach losing its limbs.

Unfortunately, cockroaches have the ability to regenerate. Cockroaches who have lost their legs can grow new ones within a few weeks. If they are lucky enough, once the cockroach was able to regenerate its limbs, it will be able to continue living its life as if nothing happened.

In addition to suffering from burns, cockroaches who survive being sprayed with insecticide also suffer from respiratory problems. The chemicals can damage their lungs and make it difficult for them to breathe. In some cases, the damage is so severe that the cockroach dies from respiratory failure.

Cockroaches who survive being sprayed with insecticide usually don’t live for very long. While it’s true that some may survive and get away unscathed, the majority of them will end up suffering from some pretty severe injuries.

So, if you’re looking to get rid of these pests, it’s best to use an insecticide that will kill them instantly. That way, you don’t have to worry about them coming back to haunt you later. Or better yet, just call a professional pest control company to do the job for you. They have the experience and the knowledge to get rid of these pests quickly and efficiently.

Final Thoughts

Large cockroaches, when sprayed with an insecticide from a wide nozzle, can take up to 7 days to die. However, smaller cockroaches, when sprayed with a fine-mist nozzle, can die in as little as 2 minutes. The time it takes for a cockroach to die also depends on different factors such as the temperature, the main ingredient used in the insecticide, and the cockroach’s size.